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2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award Winners Announced

Shepparton Art Museum (SAM) is delighted to announce the winners of the Indigenous Ceramic Art Award (ICAA), the premier national award for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists working in ceramics. First prize recipients are the Bankstown Koori Elders Group for their work After The Rain, Bungle Bungle. The collective of artists who meet weekly at Sydney’s Condell Park, will share the $20,000 acquisitive prize.

First prize recipients are the Bankstown Koori Elders Group for their work After The Rain, Bungle Bungle. The collective of artists who meet weekly at Sydney's Condell Park, will share the $20,000 acquisitive prize.

The $10,000 second prize has been awarded to Alison Milyika Carroll, a Pitjantjatjara artist for her work Ngayuku Walka.

The $3,000 acquisitive Encouragement award for a Victorian artist has been awarded to Robyne Latham, a Yamatji woman from Western Australia, who has lived in Melbourne for the past 28 years. In the work PODS3, Robyne references the lynching of Aboriginal men for providing bush tucker for their families.

Three Special Acquisition Prizes have also been awarded to Tanya Flower, Shauna Colin and Anne Thompson.

SAM Director Kirsten Paisley commented:

‘We were very impressed with the scale and collaborative nature of the Bankstown Koori Elders Group and intrigued by the way in which they had come together from various cultural and language groups to conceive and beautifully resolve a single vision of the remote landscape of the Bungle Bungles. The vibrant crystal blue glaze depicting rock-pools created after the rain is evocative of a remarkable place in Australia and shares their appreciation for the ancient rock formations there. From Ernabella in remote South Australia, Milyika Carroll's large pot is absolutely divine, the back glaze sparkles at all its edges where she has carved into the surface joyous designs which she refers to in the title as simply Ngayuku Walka, meaning `my mark'. We were moved by the hand working of this traditional, coil -built pot, a strong and voluminous female form which is proudly inscribed with the artists own marks. Robyne's work depicts three seed pods rejuvenating after fire. ‘PODS3' have been burnished and raku fired leaving the beautiful marks of fire all over the surface. They have an irrepressible personality, and act as a powerful metaphor for life after fire and the rejuvenation Aboriginal people and cultural forms.

The ICAA celebrates and supports the rich, vibrant and diverse use of the ceramic medium by Indigenous artists. The winning works were selected from 22 shortlisted artists from across Australia, including Adelaide; Melbourne; Ernabella; Cairns; Torres Strait Islands; Bankstown, Sydney and Victoria. The award winners were announced at the official opening of the exhibition on Saturday 24 May at 4pm, following a Public Forum on Indigenous Art and Ceramics as part of the Indigenous Ceramic Art Award Cultural Weekend.

The 2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award is funded by the Sir Andrew and Lady Fairley Foundation, Margaret Lawrence Bequest Perpetual Trustees, Mr Allan Myers AO QC, S.J. Rothfield Family Fund and Greater Shepparton City Council.
The 2014 ICAA exhibition along with a solo exhibition by Melbourne-based artist, Bindi Cole, titled Bindi Cole: I Am is now showing until 10 August 2014 at the Shepparton Art Museum, Victoria.

1st prize
Bankstown Koori Elders Group, After The Rain, Bungle Bungle 2013
ceramic on MDF board 39.5 x 93 x 197 x 487 cm

2nd Prize
Alison Milyika Carroll, Ngayuku Walka 2014
ceramic 54 x 29 x 30 cm

Victorian Prize
Robyn Latham, PODS3 2014
terracotta 20 x 35 x 35 x 90 cm each

Shepparton Art Museum is proudly provided by Greater Shepparton City Council, located at 70 Welsford Street, Shepparton. For general enquiries and bookings please contact: (03) 5832 9861, email art.museum@shepparton.vic.gov.au, or visit www.sheppartonartmuseum.com.au. Open 7 days, 10am to 4pm, public holidays 1pm to 4pm. SAM is also on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @SAM_Shepparton.

2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award Opens this week at Shepparton Art Museum

Shepparton Art Museum’s fourth Indigenous Ceramic art Award (ICAA) opens this Friday 16 May along with a solo exhibition by Melbourne-based artist, Bindi Cole.

The ICAA celebrates and supports the rich, vibrant and diverse use of the ceramic medium by Indigenous artists. This year's exhibition will include work by 22 artists shortlisted across Australia, including Adelaide; Melbourne; Ernabella; Cairns; Torres Strait Islands; Bankstown, Sydney and Victoria.

With a combined prize pool of $33,000, SAM's Indigenous Ceramic Art Award is the premier national award for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists working in ceramics.

First prize $20 000 Acquisitive
Second prize $10 000 Acquisitive
Encouragement Award (for a Victorian artist) $3,000 Acquisitive

The 2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award is funded by the Sir Andrew and Lady Fairley Foundation, Margaret Lawrence Bequest Perpetual Trustees, Mr Allan Myers AO QC, S.J. Rothfield Family Fund and Greater Shepparton City Council.

The award winners will be announced at the official opening of the exhibition on Saturday 24 May at 4pm, following a Public Forum on Indigenous Art and Ceramics as part of the Indigenous Ceramic Art Award Cultural Weekend on Saturday 24 – Sunday 25 May.

SAM Director Kirsten Paisley commented:

‘The 2014 award highlights the development of artists through the award series, and also how many new artists have discovered ceramics and are beginning to make work for the first time in clay. It has been particularly encouraging to see a local ceramic studio established in Shepparton this year and previous ICAA artists teaching ceramics, as yet a further extension of the ICAA program and its impact on individuals.'

SAM will also present a film produced by Nicholas Boseley in the exhibition based on his journey to meet with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ceramic artists across Australia over the past six months. From renowned pottery studios in Hermannsburg and Ernabella, NT to a new ceramics studio for Aboriginal artists in Shepparton, Victoria; and artists working in Adelaide and the Tiwi Islands, Nicholas meets artists as they prepare to produce work to enter in the 2014 ICAA.


SPECIAL EVENTS

Public Forum on Indigenous Art and Ceramics
Saturday 24 May, 2.30pm to 4pm
This forum will ask the overarching question of: What role does the practice of Indigenous Ceramics play in the wider landscape of Australian Contemporary Art? The panellists will drill into this question to draw out some thought provoking and enlightening ideas, thoughts and observations around the direction of Aboriginal Art in the 21st Century and its place in the wider contemporary art scene. The mediator for this discussion is Joe Pascoe – Director of Insect Arts Consultancy and former Director of the Shepparton Art Gallery and Craft Victoria. The panellists come from a variety of roles within the Aboriginal Art Industry:
Elizabeth Liddle – Senior Arts Officer, Indigenous Arts, Arts Victoria
Kimberley Moulton – Project Officer and Curator at Bunjilaka Melbourne Museum
Deanne Gilson – Visual Artist
Nicholas Boseley – Curator of the 2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award and Manager of Narana Aboriginal Cultural Centre

Official Opening of the 2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award, Bindi Cole: I Am exhibition and Drawing Wall #15 by Reko Rennie
Saturday 24 May, 4pm
Come along and celebrate the opening of SAM's fourth Indigenous Ceramic Art Award, a solo exhibition of artist Bindi Cole's new and old work, and the latest instalment of the Drawing Wall by Reko Rennie.

Curatorial Floor Talk on the 2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award
Sunday 25 May, 11am
2014 ICAA curator Nicholas Boseley will speak about his experiences, interactions and discussions with Indigenous artists working in ceramics from the Torres Strait, Tiwi Islands, Darwin, Central Desert, South Australia, Queensland and Victoria prior to this exhibition. Join Nicholas for an adventure through the 2014 ICAA exhibition coloured by the ‘back story'!

Open Studio at Gallery Kaiela
Sunday 25 May, 1pm to 3pm @ Gallery Kaiela, 137-139 High Street, Shepparton
Meet Indigenous artists at work in Gallery Kaiela's newly established Ceramic Studio. The artists will speak informally about the works they have made as part of the 2014 ICAA Cultural Program.

Please RSVP to any of these events by phoning (03) 5832 9861 or emailing rsvp-sam@shepparton.vic.gov.au.

Shepparton Art Museum is proudly provided by Greater Shepparton City Council, located at 70 Welsford Street, Shepparton. For general enquiries and bookings please contact: (03) 5832 9861, email art.museum@shepparton.vic.gov.au, or visit www.sheppartonartmuseum.com.au. Open 7 days, 10am to 4pm, public holidays 1pm to 4pm. SAM is also on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @SAM_Shepparton.

ENDS

SAM presents it’s 15th Drawing Wall by Reko Rennie

Shepparton Art Museum (SAM) is proud to present its 15th Drawing Wall commission by Indigenous Melbourne-based street artist, Reko Rennie, completed in the Eastbank Centre foyer on Friday 2 May.

Melbourne-based street artist Reko Rennie belongs to the Kamilaroi/Gamilaroi people of NSW and is known for his incisive use of symbols and strong graphic style. Reko has brought his urban sensibility, biting commentary and respect for traditional culture to this new work at SAM. Three hand drawn symbols – the crown, the diamond and the Aboriginal flag – are presented as an emblematic statement about the original royalty of Australia.

‘The crown symbol is both in homage to my graffiti roots and also pays due respect to Jean-Michel Basquiat, but most importantly symbolizes sovereign status. The crown reminds us that Aboriginal people are the original sovereigns of this country,' Reko said.

‘The diamond symbol is emblematic of my connection to the Kamilaroi/Gamilaroi people. This diamond symbol is similar to a family crest; it is a part of me.'

‘The hand-drawn Aboriginal flag in the form of a graffiti tag pays respect to all Aboriginal people, from environments both urban and remote, and anywhere in between.'

Last week saw Reko install this new work, while visitors to SAM and the Eastbank Centre were able to watch Reko work until its completion on Friday afternoon.

‘Reko's work on the Drawing Wall can be appreciated on so many different levels – for its graphic beauty, diverse cultural influences and prescient commentary,' SAM curator Elise Routledge said. ‘We're very proud to be presenting the work of such an exciting and in-demand artist at SAM and invite anyone with interest in street-art, fashion, graphic design or contemporary Aboriginal culture to come and check it out.'

For more information on Reko Rennie, please visit www.rekorennie.com.

‘Regalia' by Reko Rennie for The Drawing Wall #15 will remain on display in the Eastbank Centre foyer until 27 July. It will be officially opened along with the SAM's 2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award and Bindi Cole: I Am on Saturday 24 May at 4pm.

Shepparton Art Museum (SAM) is proudly provided by Greater Shepparton City Council, located at 70 Welsford Street, Shepparton. SAM is open 7 days from 10am to 4pm (public holidays 1pm to 4pm). For general enquiries and bookings, please contact (03) 5832 9861, email art.museum@shepparton.vic.gov.au, or visit www.sheppartonartmuseum.com.au for more information.

SAM presents Bindi Cole: I Am

Shepparton Art Museum (SAM) is proud to present a solo exhibition by Bindi Cole. Bindi Cole: I Am will open on Friday 16 May until Sunday 10 August. The exhibition presents a number of works that investigate themes of love, forgiveness and redemption in Cole’s practice.

Bindi Cole's compelling photographs, videos and installations fearlessly approach taboo topics with dignity, humour and compassion. Cole is based in Melbourne with Australian and Wadawurrung heritage, and her cultural identity and personal history feature as strong themes in her art. Cole is receiving growing recognition from art institutions across the country, with her work featured in the highly successful ‘Melbourne Now' exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, and as a feature of the current 19th Biennale of Sydney.

Bindi Cole: I Am presents a new video work that reflects on current discussions around the planned repeal of section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act that makes it unlawful to insult a person or group because of their ‘race, colour or national ethnic origin'.

Bindi said 'Everyone deserves the right to be free from discrimination. There is no place in our community for hateful, shaming, denigrating, humiliating and intimidating speech. It's just not on, and I'm not sure how we arrived at a destination where some believe that this type of behaviour is acceptable, or even an absolute right.'

The exhibition also includes EH5452 (2012), an installation about the ultimately redemptive time that Cole spent imprisoned in an English gaol earlier in her life. In her artist statement about this work, Bindi Cole said ‘EH5452 aims to turn something dark, hidden and shameful into something light, revelatory and beautiful.' Accompanying EH5452 is a selection of art works made by artists currently living in Victorian prisons.

Other works include a suite of photographs of clouds in the sky at dawn and dusk. Titled Clouds Are The Dust Of His Feet (2013) and Lakorra (2013), these photographs explore Aboriginal land ownership, expressions of the sublime and religious faith. Cole's powerful video work Seventy Times Seven (2011) is also presented as a single channel installation. In this work, a number of Indigenous Australians repeat the words ‘I forgive you', creating a potent reflection on the national apology to Australia's Stolen Generations, and more broadly – the role of forgiveness in personal and political life.

Curator Elise Routledge said ‘While often deeply personal, Bindi Cole's work raises broader questions about the relationship between personal identity and established power structures in society. It is unapologetically political, but grounded in ideals of love and compassion. It's very exciting to be presenting Bindi's incisive new work to audiences in Shepparton.'

Bindi Cole: I Am will officially open along with the SAM's 2014 Indigenous Ceramic Art Award and the 15th Drawing Wall by Reko Rennie on Saturday 24 May at 4pm.

On Thursday 19 June at 6pm, the art museum will also hold a special SAM Out Late! event where Bindi Cole will discuss her work in conversation with SAM curator Elise Routledge.

Shepparton Art Museum (SAM) is proudly provided by Greater Shepparton City Council, located at 70 Welsford Street, Shepparton. SAM is open 7 days from 10am to 4pm (public holidays 1pm to 4pm).
For general enquiries and bookings, please contact (03) 5832 9861, email art.museum@shepparton.vic.gov.au, or visit www.sheppartonartmuseum.com.au for more information.